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Evaluation of the Pear Ester Kairomone as a Formulation Additive for the Granulovirus of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Pome Fruit

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/2334
File:
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Abstract:
( E, Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) is a larval kairomone for the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Orchard studies were conducted in 2005 and 2006 in apple, Malus domestica Borkhausen, and pear, Pyrus communis L., to evaluate a 5% active ingredient (AI), microencapsulated formulation of pear ester (PE-MEC) as an insecticidal additive for the codling moth granulovirus (CpGV). Although CpGV applied at 5-15-d intervals at commercial rates (2.2 x 10 ¹²-10 ¹³ granules per ha) killed the majority (82-94%) of larvae found inside infested fruit, it did not eliminate significant damage, i.e., 30-92% fruit injury at harvest versus 51-82% in controls. PE-MEC treatments had significant but inconsistent results in our tests. In apple (mixed cultivars), PE-MEC (3.7-4.7 g [AI]/ha) plus CpGV reduced the percentage of fruit injured during the second but not the first larval generation, compared with CpGV alone, but there no was no additional population reduction (live larvae collected from infested fruit and tree bands). In 'Bartlett' pear, PE-MEC (3.7 g [AI]/ha) plus CpGV significantly increased larval mortality and reduced deep fruit entries at harvest over CpGV alone in 2006, but similar improvements were not observed in 2005 when a lower rate (1.5 g [AI]/ha) was tested. Surprisingly, compared with untreated controls, the PE-MEC formulation alone also reduced fruit injury (mid-season in Bartlett) and larval survivorship inside infested fruit at harvest (2006 apple tests and both years in Bartlett). Although pear ester seems amenable as a kairomonal adjuvant for use with insecticides, our inconsistent data with CpGV in apple and pear suggest practical improvements in formulation and application strategies (e.g., to optimize and maintain attractive release rates) are needed.
Author(s):
Arthurs, S.P. , Hilton, R. , Knight, A.L. , Lacey, L.A.
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Journal of economic entomology 2007 June, v. 100, no. 3
Language:
English
Publisher:
Entomological Society of America
Year:
2007
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.