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Energy-dense liquid fuel intermediates by pyrolysis of guayule (Parthenium argentatum) shrub and bagasse

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/35832
File:
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Abstract:
Guayule is a perennial shrub grown in the southwestern United States that is used to produce high quality, natural rubber latex. However, only about 10% of the plant material is used for latex production; the remaining biomass, called bagasse, can be used for renewable fuel production. Fast pyrolysis of guayule, both whole shrub and bagasse was performed. From both feedstocks a very viscous, high energy content (approximately 30 MJ/kg) pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil) was produced in yields averaging over 60% without any catalyst. The properties and compositions of the bio-oils were found to be similar in the two feedstocks. Co-products, charcoal (20-30 wt%) and non-condensable gas (5-15%), were also dense and had a high energy content. Of the two feedstocks, the whole shrub yielded higher quantities of charcoal that also had a higher energy content than the charcoal produced from bagasse. As a result, the energy recovery, estimated as the percentage of the energy products, to energy input into the reactor was lower (60%) for guayule bagasse than for the whole shrub (73%). This notwithstanding, the bagasse is a more attractive feedstock for thermochemical conversion, not only because it is a residue from a primary process (latex extraction) that is on-site, but also because it has a high energy content. Moreover, it produces high quality pyrolysis products. Co-production of latex rubber from the whole shrub and renewable fuels from the residual bagasse by pyrolysis should improve the already positive economics of the guayule latex rubber industry.
Author(s):
Boateng, Akwasi A. , Mullen, Charles A. , Goldberg, Neil M. , Hicks, Kevin B. , McMahan, Colleen M. , Whalen, Maureen C. , Cornish, Katrina
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Fuel 2009 Nov., v. 88, issue 11
Language:
English
Year:
2009
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.